This is where most of your store bought eggs..…

This is where most of your store bought eggs come from. On average, each caged hen is afforded only 67 square inches of cage space, less than a sheet of letter sized paper on which to live her entire life. Because of their close quarters, the birds are stressed pulling out or losing feathers, most are fed antibiotics to keep them healthy.

Cage-free hens

Cage-free hens are able to walk, spread their wings and lay their eggs in nests, vital natural behaviors denied to hens confined in cages. Most cage-free hens live in very large flocks that can consist of many thousands of hens who never go outside. Free-range and Organic standards are not much better. They have to have the “ability” to go outside. Which often means the same housing, but somewhere there will be a dog door and outdoor kennel where a few birds may actually go.

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The conditions for commercially raised meat birds and turkeys are not much better.  The above photo qualifies for Cage-free, perhaps Free-range as well as Organic.

Know your farmer

Know your farmer, get your meat and eggs from organically-fed and pastured birds that are able to forage, and enjoy the sunshine and fresh air. Not only is it a better life for the birds, but superior nutritionally for you as well. Pastured animals have a higher ratio of Omega-3 fats, higher levels of beta carotene and vitamins A & E as well as less cholesterol and saturated fats. The taste is superior as well!

Know your farmer

Know your farmer, get your meat and eggs from organically-fed and pastured birds that are able to forage, and enjoy the sunshine and fresh air. Not only is it a better life for the birds, but superior nutritionally for you as well. Pastured animals have a higher ratio of Omega-3 fats, higher levels of beta carotene and vitamins A & E as well as less cholesterol and saturated fats. The taste is superior as well!

Cage-free hens

Cage-free hens are able to walk, spread their wings and lay their eggs in nests, vital natural behaviors denied to hens confined in cages. Most cage-free hens live in very large flocks that can consist of many thousands of hens who never go outside. Free-range and Organic standards are not much better. They have to have the “ability” to go outside. Which often means the same housing, but somewhere there will be a dog door and outdoor kennel where a few birds may actually go.

The conditions for commercially raised meat birds and turkeys are not much better.  The above photo qualifies for Cage-free, perhaps Free-range as well as Organic.

This is where most of your store bought eggs

This is where most of your store bought eggs come from. On average, each caged hen is afforded only 67 square inches of cage space, less than a sheet of letter sized paper on which to live her entire life. Because of their close quarters, the birds are stressed pulling out or losing feathers, most are fed antibiotics to keep them healthy.